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NEWS BREAK

  NEWS BREAK

Program Content for January 26, 2015

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, January 25, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Auschwitz survivor remembers liberation (Main News, page A12)

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. Before you read this article, look at the title. Have you heard of Auschwitz before? What do you think Auschwitz is and where was it located? What does it mean to be liberated? Look up the definition if you’re are unfamiliar with the word liberation. Who do you think was liberated from Auschwitz? Look at the photo accompanying the article for additional clues.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    Aryan

B.    deemed

C.    emaciated

D.    exterminate

E.    genocide

F.    Holocaust

G.    iconic

H.    infamous

I.      infirmary

J.     inmates

K.    irony

L.     liberated

M.   perspective

N.    sadistic

O.    systematically

  

1.     to destroy or kill (a group of animals, people, etc.) completely

2.     a situation that is strange or funny because things happen in a way that seems to be the opposite of what you expected

3.     (in Nazi doctrine) a non-Jewish Caucasian

4.     a place where sick people stay and are cared for in a school, prison, summer camp, etc.

5.     a widely known symbol

6.     enjoyment that someone gets from being violent or cruel or from causing pain

7.     a person who is kept in a prison or mental hospital

8.     to think of (someone or something) in a particular way

9.     to free (someone or something) from being controlled by another person, group, etc.

10.  the deliberate killing of people who belong to a particular racial, political, or cultural group

11.  using a careful system or method : done according to a system

12.  well-known for being bad : known for evil acts or crimes

13.  very thin because of hunger or disease

14.  a way of thinking about and understanding something (such as a particular issue or life in general)

15.  the killing of millions of Jews and other people by the Nazis during World War II

 

Comprehension

  1. How old was Marta Wise when she was liberated by Russian soldiers from Auschwitz?
  2. Marta and the other prisoners were emaciated when they were freed by the Russians on January 27, 1945. How much did she weigh at that time?
  3. When Wise heard the distant sound of soldiers marching toward Auschwitz she thought it was German troops. How did she realize that the troops were Russian?
  4. Auschwitz has come to represent the horrors of the ________, in which Nazi Germany and its allies__________ killed 6 million Jews. (Fill in the blanks – 2 words)  
  5. The Nazis also killed an additional 5 million non-Jewish people that they deemed to be what?
  6. For awhile, Wise who was blond was able live under an assumed _________ identity with false papers throughout most of the war. (Fill in the blank)
  7. Wise was captured on her 10th birthday and she and her sister were eventually sent to Auschwitz and put in the block of a Nazi doctor, Josef Mengele. What was done to them there?
  8. Explain how Wise’s sister being in the infirmary and Wise staying behind with the rest of the ailing prisoners may have saved their lives when the Nazis abandoned Auschwitz.
  9. Wise said that before the Nazis left they gathered her and some of the remaining prisoners and locked them into an enclosure. Explain what happened next.
  10. After the war Wise and her sister were able to be reconnected with their parents and all of their siblings – true or false?

 

Additional Activities  

1)     Students can enter the 2015 Holocaust Writing, Art and Film Contest. This year’s theme is: Liberation: 70 Years Later and asks students to answer the question: How can the lessons of the Holocaust inspire you to help make the world a better place?

The contest is open to students in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska. Entries may be submitted through April 3, 2015. For more information and contest rules go to:

http://www.holocaustcenterseattle.org/education/writing-art-contest.

  

2)    Have students read the series of three articles "WITH MY OWN EYES: Holocaust. Genocide. Today." presented by the Holocaust Center and The Seattle Times Newspapers In Education. Articles and accompanying lesson plans can be found at: http://www.holocaustcenterseattle.org/education/lessons-activities-handouts. 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, January 25, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.      What killed a 32-foot gray whale that turned up dead under the Coleman Dock ferry terminal Wednesday? (NW Sunday)

2.      How much has Marshawn Lynch been fined by the NFL in the past few months for three separate offenses? (Sports)

3.      In India, a metal trap introduced a few years ago to trap monkeys was only effective until what happened? (Main)

4.      What did Russian farmers use kettlebells for in the 1700’s? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      In 2015, what will all taxpayers have to report to the IRS for the first time? (Business)

6.      For the first time in the Mustang’s 50-year history it will be sold overseas. What country is it on its way to first? (NWAutos)

7.      What was accidently knocked off the gold mask of King Tut last August and glued back on with epoxy? (Main)

8.      Beginning January 28, in preparation for the Super Bowl, a dozen city blocks in Phoenix will be transformed into an outdoor fun zone called what?  (NW Traveler)

9.      Tapers are a type of what? (Sunday Market)

10.   How much did Marta Wise, one of the few surviving children imprisoned in the infamous Nazi death camp Auschwitz, weigh when the Russian soldiers arrived to liberate her and the other prisoners? How old was she at that time? (Main)

11.   Around what percent of jobs are acquired through networking? (NW Jobs)

12.   Where can you find pink dolphins when visiting South America? (NW Traveler)

13.   Enrollment in Seattle schools is growing by about how many students per year? How many portable classrooms does Seattle School District currently have? (NW Sunday)

14.   What type of food is cassoulet and where is it from? (Pacific NW)

15.  What two-time Wimbledon champion, did unseeded American, Madison Keys, defeat in their third-round match at the Australian Open in Melbourne on Saturday?  (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

Program Content for January 21, 2015

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Monday, January 19, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. 

 Remembering that day in Selma (Main, page A10

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

  1. Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about based on the title. Next, look at the photo accompanying the article. What do you think the people in the photo are doing? What objects are they holding? What clues do the objects give you to what is happening in the photo?

 

2. . Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below. 

A.     activist

B.     brutality

C.     civil rights

D.     comic relief

E.     confrontation

F.     core

G.    inspired

H.     memoir

I.       mischievously

J.      movement

K.     peppering

L.      preceded

M.    sidled

N.     sweltering

O.    transformational

  

1.      to move close to someone in a quiet or secret way

2.      an amusing scene, incident, or speech introduced into serious or tragic elements or events, as in a play, in order to provide temporary relief from tension

3.      showing a playful desire to cause trouble

4.      very hot  and uncomfortable

5.      a situation in which people, groups, etc., fight, oppose, or challenge each other in an angry way

6.      to hit something many times and in many different places; to shower with questions or requests (used figuratively)

7.      cruel, harsh, and usually violent treatment of another person

8.      the most important or basic part of something

9.      to happen, go, or come before (something or someone)

10.   a written account in which someone (such as a famous performer or politician) describes past experiences

11.   causing or able to cause a change; causing someone's life to be different or better in some important way

12.   a person who uses or supports strong actions (such as public protests) to help make changes in politics or society

13.   to make (someone) want to do something

14.   a series of organized activities in which many people work together to do or achieve something

15.   the rights that every person should have regardless of his or her sex, race, or religion

  

  

Comprehension  

  1. How old was Lowery when she joined Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for the 1965 march from the Alabama cities of Selma to Montgomery?
  2. What specific right were the marchers demanding for African Americans?
  3. When Lowery spoke at the New York Historical society and was asked the question when faced with the brutality, “Why didn’t you fight back?” What reason did she give?
  4. By the time Lowery was 15, how many times had she been jailed?

a)     3 times

b)     9 times

c)     14 times

  1. Lowery showed a scar she still bears on the back of her head. Describe the how she got the scar (who gave it to her, when, etc).
  2. A month before the march to Selma, activist Jimmie Lee Jackson was beaten and shot by a state trooper. What did his death inspire?
  3. Lowery told how she and her young friends were released from the “sweatbox”, a windowless, sweltering cell by police and asked to sign their names for the record. Describe what she and her friends did as a moment of comic relief.
  4. According to the article, who is at the core of Lowery’s memoir titled “Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom”?
  5. When watching the film “Selma” what did Lowery do during the scene when police were attacking protesters during a march that was dubbed “Bloody Sunday”?
  6. Lowery was the youngest person to join the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery– true or false?

 

Additional Activities

1.      “Steady, loving confrontation.” Lowery said those were the first words she heard from the mouth of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and that those words changed her life.

 

 As a class discuss: What do each of those words mean by themselves? How does the meaning change when you place the words together? What do you think King meant by these words based on what you know about him and his beliefs?

 

You can listen to some of King’s speeches on The Seattle Times special MLK website located here: http://seattletimes.com/special/mlk/king/speeches.html

 

 

2.      Read the following quote from the article: Lowery, who lives in Selma, said that even today, “you have the ability to change something each day of your life.”  Have your students journal about a change they would make in their life in order to make the world a better place.

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

 

Program Content for January 19, 2015

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, January 18, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

In ‘Selma,’ local man finds memories of marching with MLK (NW Arts & Life, page H1)

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you know about civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. Why do we honor Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. with a special holiday?
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    captured

B.    chronicles

C.    civil rights

D.    impacted

E.    imposing

F.    lynch mob

G.    slur

H.    taunt

I.      volatile

J.     uplifting

K.    memoir

L.     propelled

 

 

1.     a powerful or major influence or effect

2.     likely to become dangerous or out of control

3.     a description of events in the order that they happened

4.     a written account in which someone (such as a famous performer or politician) describes past experiences

5.     an insulting remark about someone or someone's character

6.     to push or drive (someone or something) forward or in a particular direction

7.     a large, angry group of people that kills a person for some presumed offense without legal authority

8.     to describe or show (someone or something) in a very accurate way by using writing, painting, film, etc.

9.     to say insulting things to (someone) in order to make that person angry

10.  very large or impressive

11.  causing happy and hopeful feelings

12.  the rights that every person should have regardless of his or her sex, race, or religion

 

Comprehension

  1. What does the film “Selma” chronicle?
  2. The march on Selma directly impacted the _____ _______ _____ of 1965. (Fill in the blanks – 3 words)  
  3. How did actor, Steve Marlo hear about the march from Brown’s Chapel in Selma, to the state capital in Montgomery, Alabama?
  4. How did actor, Steve Marlo first discover he was in the movie “Selma”?
  5. When Steve Marlo arrived in Birmingham, Alabama with a friend and actor Robert Gist, they were welcomed by an imposing sheriff’s deputy in the airport with a _____. (Fill in the blank)
  6. The first day of the Selma March, led by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., would become known as what, after 600 marchers were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas?
  7. The night of the first day of the march, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. led the marchers back to a church. According to the article, what happened that night?
  8. How did actor Steve Marlo capture the march?
  9. Steve Marlo said that when nighttime came “We were all scared”. Describe the training exercise they did to protect the black marchers and “who was on top”.
  10. Give one example mentioned in the article of how the marchers were taunted or assaulted during the march.
  11. Steve Marlo said that the reasons that propelled him to go on the Selma march still ring true years later – true or false?

 

Additional Activities  

In honor of Martin Luther King Jr’s birthday, NIE is providing you with a variety of activities that integrate his philosophy and beliefs. Many of these activities can be done at any time so that his legacy is celebrated throughout the year. Some excerpts from his famous speeches are attached as an addendum, additional items can be found at The Seattle Times MLK Jr. Web site: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/special/mlk/

Activities:

Timelines:

1)     Martin Luther King Jr. had an amazing life that spanned over three decades. Within that time, MLK Jr. changed our world. Have students research his life and create a timeline of events that they think are significant. You may want them to use The Seattle Times.com MLK Web site to help you with this activity.

2)     Next, have students interview a family member who was alive during that same time period (if no one in their immediate family was alive, find a family friend or neighbor to interview). Have students record her/his significant events on the same timeline they created for MLK Jr.

3)     Last, have students identify four events of significance in their own lifetime. They will be adding two of them to the class timeline.

4)     As a class, create a timeline that includes a minimum of 2 events from each students’ family history and their own. Be sure to include MLK Jr. timeline events on your class one. You may want to highlight those so as to distinguish between his and others. Discuss the following questions as a group:

a.     What are the shared experiences of those interviewed?

b.     What are some differences between the experiences of those interviewed – how could you categorize them? – Race, class, gender, age, urban/rural, etc.

c.     What voice is missing from this timeline? Why? What does it tell you about your school community and its diversity?

d.     How have we changed, or not changed?

e.     Has our nation grown?

Newspaper Activities:

Is King’s dream our reality?

One of King’s most famous speeches is, “I have a dream.” In it, King describes his vision for the United States. Have students read this speech in groups (See addendum in educator’s e-mail). Have each group identify five items that King visualizes for the US. Then, have students search through the Sunday newspaper for articles and ads that illustrate those five items. Do the articles/ads provide witness to the realization of King’s dream OR do they demonstrate that we still have a ways to go until his dream is realized?  Discuss the findings as a group – be sure to challenge students’ assumptions using some of the headlines from the newspaper. After the discussion, have students write a 500-word opinion article that defends their own opinion on the issue.

 

 

Learning from History:

Have students look for additional articles in the Sunday newspaper that discuss King and his legacy. Then, have them summarize it using the 5W and H method (Who, what, where, when, why important and how it relates to their lives).

MLK Speeches:

1)     Place students in groups of 3 or 4 and distribute one of King’s speeches (see addendum attached to the educator’s e-mail – contact NIE if you do not have it: 206/652-6290) to each group (each student should have their own copy).

2)     Ask the students to read each speech silently and then discuss the speech with each other for about 15 minutes. Someone in the group should keep notes of their conversation because they will be reporting back to the larger group.

3)     Near the end of the class, have representatives from each group stand up to summarize the article and provide the larger group with highlights of their discussion.

4)     As the students leave your room, have them write one thing they learned from this activity on a post-it. Collect them as they leave class. Review them and find out what your students learned from you today

  

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, January 18, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.      When rent control is in effect in a state, who sets the rent amounts? (NW Sunday)

2.      What did Earl Thomas, the Seahawks’ fifth-year safety say that happiness was to him? (Sports)

3.      What did the Dallas Safari Club cancel plans to auction off at their auction this year? What did they face international criticism for auctioning off last year? (Main)

4.      The first day of the Selma March, led by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., would become known as what, after 600 marchers were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      What is Google’s “Project Zero” and what is it dedicated to doing? (Business)

6.      Nissan and NASA have announced a five-year partnership in order to develop what? (NWAutos)

7.      Where was an 1882 Winchester rifle found and what was it found leaning against during an archaeological survey in November? (Main)

8.      Author John Steinbeck said “It was a fortunate accident which drew me to this place” while doing research on King Arthur. What place was he referring to?  (NW Traveler)

9.      What is Michael Gordon, founder of Hairstory, an advocate for when it comes to hair? (Sunday Market)

10.   What do preliminary results of genetic analysis on an ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man point to as the heritage of Kennewick Man? (Main)

11.   According to the Bloomberg BNA Employer Survey, what percentage of U.S. employers will provide a paid day off for Martin Luther King Jr. Day? (NW Jobs)

12.   What hurricane hit Cabo San Lucas last September? How high were the winds? (NW Traveler)

13.   What Tacoma museum is offering free admission on Monday to celebrate Martin Luther King Jr’s legacy? (NW Sunday)

14.   Permaculture is a design approach to meeting human needs while still supporting what function? (Pacific NW)

15.  At what age did Roosevelt High School basketball player Cam Haslam lose his father to cancer? Who became a mentor and father figure to him? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

  

 


Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company