Return to NIE


Name ______________________________________________________

NEWS BREAK

 NEWS BREAK

Program Content for August 26, 2015 

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Monday, August 24, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. 

Zookeepers: Odds are good for twin pandas (Main News, page A2

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

1.      Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about. Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions. Also discuss what clues the photo accompanying the article might give you.

2.  Vocabulary:  Match the words or phrases to the numbered definitions below.        

 

A.     aggressive

B.     captivity

C.     critical

D.     endangered

E.     gender

F.     incubator

G.    left to their own devices

H.     in residence

I.       serum

J.      survival rate

K.     swap

L.      technique

M.    tradition

N.     warily

O.    without incident

 

 

1.      extremely important

2.      living in a particular place at a particular time

3.      the stories, beliefs, etc., that have been part of the culture of a group of people for a long time

4.      a piece of equipment in which very weak or sick babies are placed for special care and protection after their birth

5.      to replace (something) with something else

6.      used to describe a type of animal or plant that has become very rare and that could die out completely

7.      the percentage of people or animals in a study or group who are alive for a given period of time, after a diagnosis, birth, etc.

8.      without any unexpected trouble

9.      the state of being kept in a place (such as a prison or a cage) and not being able to leave or be free

10.   a way of doing something by using special knowledge or skill

11.   the state of being male or female

12.   the part of blood that is like water and that contains substances (called antibodies) that fight disease

13.   allowed to do what you want or what you are able to do without being controlled or helped by anyone

14.   ready and willing to fight, argue, etc.

15.   not having or showing complete trust in someone or something that could be dangerous or cause trouble

 

Comprehension

 

1.      Why is the National Zoo using the technique of swapping out the cubs? (Be as specific as possible)

2.      When a cub is not nursing and bonding with its mother, where is it kept?

3.      According to the article, by late Sunday afternoon how many times had the twin cubs traded places without incident?

4.      What have the cubs done when being taken away from their mother that is a sign that they are strong and healthy?

5.      What color are the cubs?

6.      According to the article, the second cub was given a serum draw previously from its mother’s blood. Why was the second cub given a serum?

7.      Zoo officials said it would be three or four weeks before the cubs’ _________ are known. (Fill in the blank)

8.      Two decades ago, the survival rate for panda cubs was under 20 percent. Now the survival rate is more than _______ percent. (Multiple Choice)

a)     80

b)     90

c)     95

d)     None of the above

9.      Why won’t the new cubs be named until they are 100 days old?

10.   More panda cubs born in the Washington, D.C. have survived than died – true or false?

 

Additional Activities

1.      Using your school/local library or the internet, research to find answers to the following:

A)     What is the panda’s natural habitat?

B)     On average how much does a panda weigh and how tall are they?

C)    What is their average life span?

D)    What do pandas eat?

E)     The panda is listed as an endangered species. How many pandas are left in the wild? How many are in zoos?

2.      Answer the following questions about the article you just read:

A.     Who or what is this article about?

B.     Why do you think this article is important?

C.     What is the most important or interesting fact you learned from this article?

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

Program Content for August 24, 2015  

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, August 23 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

State Farm: Steering Teens to Safety (Special Section, page J2).

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. Look at the title of this special section. What does it mean to be a safe driver? Make a list of things you can do to be a safe driver. Then make a list of driving distractions that are unsafe to do while driving.  
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    citation

B.    collision

C.    exception

D.    graduated

E.    independently

F.    intermediate

G.    limitations

H.    phasing in

I.      privileges

J.     probationary

K.    supervised

L.     violation

 

 

1.     gradually increasing

2.     a right or benefit that is given to some people and not to others

3.     to watch and direct (someone or something)

4.     something that controls how much of something is possible or allowed

5.     an official order to appear before a court of law

6.     the act of doing something that is not allowed by a law or rule

7.     relating to or having the knowledge or skill of someone who is more advanced than a beginner but not yet an expert

8.     a case where a rule does not apply

9.     a situation or period of time in which a person who is starting a new job or learning something new is tested and watched to see if that person is able to do the job properly

10.  not requiring or relying on other people for help or support

11.  to start to use or do (something) gradually over a period of time : to introduce (something) slowly

12.  a crash in which two or more things or people hit each other

 

Comprehension

  1. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) laws are designed to gradually provide new drivers with critical behind-the-wheel experience by phasing in full ________ over time and in _______ settings. (Fill in the blanks)
  2. Graduated Driver Licensing laws means that at the very least there are at least _______ stages of licensure. (Fill in the blank)
  3. If you are under 18 in Washington state for the first 12 months, you cannot drive between the hours of ______ and ______ unless you are with a licensed driver age 25 or older. (Multiple Choice)

a)     11 p.m. – 3 a.m.

b)    12 a.m. – 4 a.m.

c)     1 a.m. – 5 a.m.

  1. What is the only exception to the nighttime driving rule above in question three?
  2. In what stage of GDL laws does a new driver receive a Learner’s Permit?
  3. A Probationary or Intermediate License allows you to drive independently after logging at least how many hours of supervised driving practice and passing an on-the-road exam?
  4. If you are under 18 when you get your license in Washington state you aren’t permitted to use wireless devices while driving. What is the only exception to this rule?
  5. If you are under 18 when you get your license in Washington state, for the first six months you cannot drive with passenger under what age, unless they are members of your immediate family?
  6. The final stage of driving is a Full License. This is obtained after you have remained free of _________ for a set period of time. (Fill in the blank)
  7. In Washington state, if you are under 18, you need at least 10 hours driving at night with someone who has been licensed for five years or more – true or false?

 

Additional Activities  

1.     Research another state’s GDL laws to see how they compare to Washington state’s. How are they similar? How are they different?

2.     Using the search function of the e-Edition find articles pertaining to traffic accidents. Try to find at least two articles, then for each article list the cause for the accident if known and what could have been done to prevent the accident if anything.

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

  

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, August 23, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions. 

1.   What is hydrofluoric acid often used in carwash products to do? (NW Sunday)

2.   What is Joey Cora, the second baseman for the 1995 Mariners team doing now? (Sports)

3.   As of Saturday about how many firefighters and support crew were combating 12 large files in Washington? (Main)

4.   The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists estimates that how many women experience depression during pregnancy or within 12 months of delivery? (NW Arts & Life)

5.   What city in Washington state is a sister city to Cuautla, Mexico? (Business)

6.   On average, what percent more do drivers age 18 – 24 pay in Washington if they sign up for their own car-insurance policy, as opposed to staying on their parents plan? (NWAutos)

7.   Lt. Shaye Harver and Capt. Kristen Griest were the first-ever female graduates of what rigorous Army school? (Main)

8.   The village of Eyam in the county of Derbyshire in England is also known by what name and why? (NW Traveler)

9.   Linen is naturally lint-free and resistant to what? (Shop NW)

10. What deadly chemical was the warehouse in Tianjin that exploded on August 12 storing at least 700 tons of? (Main)

11.  According to research conducted in 2012 by Rober Matchock of Pennsylvania State University, most people are more easily distracted between what hours of the day? (NW Jobs)

12.  How many square miles is Lummi Island? (NW Traveler)

13.  On what date in September will there be a new moon? (NW Sunday)

14.  How much money does speech pathologist Liz Buzzard need to raise each year for the maintenance of the Seattle Children’s PlayGarden? (Pacific NW)

15.  On August 24, 1995 Ken Griffey Jr. launched a two-run homer off of what Yankee closer? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

Program Content for August 17, 2015  

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, August 16 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Return of chimney rocks honors Bend’s long-lost Klondike Kate (NW Sunday, page B7).

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. Who do you think Klondike Kate is? What do you think she is famous for? Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about and who Klondike Kate is. Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    agates

B.    breach of contract

C.    dedication

D.    demolished

E.    fateful

F.    grotto

G.    homestead

H.    jilted

I.      mason

J.     memorial

K.    petrified

L.     replica

M.   travelogue

 

1.     to destroy (a building, bridge, etc.) : to forcefully tear down or take apart (a structure)

2.     used to describe something (such as wood) that has slowly changed into stone or a substance like stone over a very long period of time

3.     a small cave; an artificial cavernlike recess or structure

4.     a skilled worker who builds or works with stone, brick, or concrete

5.     a very hard stone used especially in jewelry that has colors arranged in stripes or in patches

6.     a piece of government land that a person could acquire by living on it and farming it when the western part of the U.S. was being settled

7.     an exact or very close copy of something

8.     the act of officially saying that something (such as a new building) was created for a particular purpose (such as worship) or to remember or honor a particular person

9.     something (such as a monument or ceremony) that honors a person who has died or serves as a reminder of an event in which many people died

10.  a speech, movie, or piece of writing about someone's experiences while traveling

11.  failing to perform any term of a contract without a legitimate legal excuse

12.  having important results

13.  to end a romantic relationship with (someone) in a sudden and painful way  

 

Comprehension

  1. In what state was Klondike Kate born in 1876? (Multiple Choice)

a)     Alaska

b)    Kansas

c)     Oregon

d)    Washington

  1. According to the article, how did Klondike Kate make her name?
  2. What did Kate see that eventually made her settle in Oregon after she took her dance act on the road and toured the country?
  3. How did Kate earn her other nickname “Aunt Kate” while living in Bend, Oregon?
  4. Name two things mentioned in the article that Kate Rockwell had built with the rocks she had collected in the High Desert
  5. How did Chuck Rollins, a passionate rockhound and historian, come to find the 6,000 pounds of rocks from Kate’s former home in Bend, Oregon?
  6. The 6,000 pounds of rocks Chuck Rollins purchased will be used to make up what portion of a memorial wall being planned by the Columbia Gorge Rockhounds?
  7. According Rollins, why will Kate’s portion of the memorial wall be facing west?
  8. Nate Pedersen, the President of the Deschutes County Historical Society, also received about 600 pounds of Kate’s rocks that Chuck Rollins purchased. What is he planning on building with the rocks he received?
  9. Rockhounding is the official state hobby of Oregon – true or false?

 

Additional Activities  

1.     Research to find out additional details of Klondike Kate’s life not discussed in the article. Then write 1 – 2 paragraphs about her based on the information your read. Below are some websites to help get you started.

http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/klondike_kate/#.VdDv_010xdg

http://www.litsite.org/index.cfm?section=Digital-Archives&page=Industry&cat=Mining&viewpost=2&ContentId=2713

 

2.     Answer the following questions about the article you just read:

A.    Who or what is this article about?

B.    Why do you think this article is important?

C.    What is the most important or interesting fact you learned from this article?

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, August 16, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions. 

1.    Name three things that Kate Rockwell, better known as Klondike Kate, had built with the showy stones she had collected in the High Desert. (NW Sunday)

2.   The Seahawks are the first team since what team in the 1970’s to lead the league in scoring defense for three consecutive seasons? (Sports)

3.   What did North Korea announce it was altering and moving 30 minutes? (Main)

4.   What is the title of Seattle author Ivan Doig’s final novel? (NW Arts & Life)

5.   Under a George W. Bush-era executive order, oil pipelines crossing U.S. borders require what? (Business)

6.   What percent of drivers aged 65 and older in the U.S. is still driving? (NWAutos)

7.   Over the past eight years, the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services (DSHS) has been hit with scores of lawsuits for failing to protect children. How much has DSHS paid out over the past eight years for personal-injury claims? (Main)

8.   What day in August do visitors not need a Discover Pass to enjoy Washington’s state parks? (NW Traveler)

9.   What does the wool batting in Holy Lamb Organics’ Natural Wool Comforters help with? (Shop NW)

10.  The Germans call a “hot day” a “Hitzetag”. Officially what temperature does it have to reach to be called this? (Main)

11.  What is the average salary for a player in the NBA? (NW Jobs)

12.  The Valle de los Cirios is named for the plant that grows there. What does “cirios” mean in Spanish and why was the plant given that name? (NW Traveler)

13.  Why have crews of people been wading into the Dungeness River and rearranging rocks? (NW Sunday)

14.  Which crocosmia has the largest flowers in the genus? (Pacific NW)

15.  What was discovered in 2009 that robbed Craig Noble Jr. of his chance to play out his dreams of football stardom with the Huskies? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 


Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company