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NEWS BREAK

 NEWS BREAK

Program Content for April 16, 2014

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Monday, April 14, 2014 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content before using in your classroom.

Gloomy town reflects on way to soak up the sun (By Suzanne Daley, Main News page A6

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

  1. Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about.  Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions. Also, discuss what clues the picture accompanying the story might give you.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.     

 

A.     bolstering

B.     contribution

C.     cutting edge

D.     generator

E.     in concert

F.     industrialist

G.    mechanism

H.     opponent

I.       produced

J.      petition

K.     quaint

L.      setbacks

 

 

1.      a written document that people sign to show that they want a person or organization to do or change something

2.      together

3.      someone who owns or manages an industry

4.      the newest and most advanced area of activity in an art, science, etc.

5.      to make (something) especially by using machines

6.      something that is done to cause something to happen

7.      a problem that makes progress more difficult or success less likely

8.      a piece of machinery: a mechanical part or group of parts having a particular function

9.      a machine that produces electricity

10.   having an old-fashioned or unusual quality or appearance that is usually attractive or appealing

11.   to make (something) stronger or better; to give support to (something)

12.   a person, group. Etc. that is against something (such as an action, law, or system): someone or something that does not want something to exist, be done, etc.

 

 

Comprehension  

  1. In what country is the gloomy town of Rjukan located?
  2. Where does the sun disappear to and how long does it disappear for during the year?
  3. Martin Andersen, an artist and newcomer to the town, came up with the idea of using huge mirrors to get sunlight to the town – true or false?
  4. What two ways are the mirrors powered?
  5. How did many residents of the town say life changed after the mirrors were installed?
  6. Most of the people in the town of 6,000 signed the petition to block the mirror project– true or false?
  7. What happened that bolstered the argument of those who called the project a waste of money?
  8. At one point, the mirrors stopped working altogether. Explained what happened and what was done to get the mirrors working again.
  9. The town of Rjukan was built by the industrialist Samuel Eyde. What did Eyde build, that still exists today, so his employees could get sunshine in the winter?

     

Additional Activities/Questions

1. Read the following section from the article: Others, however have not been impressed. Annar Torresvold, 77 and his wife, Anne-Lise Odegaard, 70, still think the 5 million kroner (roughly $840,000) spent on the mirrors might have been better spent elsewhere. They worry about a possible closing of the hospital, the quality of the schools and health care for seniors. Do you think the money for the mirror project was well spent – why or why not? Do you think that the money would have been better spent on some of the other services mentioned?   

 

2.  As a class discuss the following questions:

a) Would you want to live somewhere that was without sunlight for the majority of the year?

b) How do you think the lack of sunlight might affect you (emotionally, physically)? Make a list of the effects it might have on you.

c) Can you think of another alternative besides mirrors to capture the sunlight that might be an effective alternative?

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Program Content for April 14, 2014

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday April 13, 2014 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.     What is a total lunar eclipse also called? When did the last total lunar eclipse occur? (NW Sunday)

2.      What trainer tied an Emerald Downs record for wins in one day by a trainer, with 5 wins on opening day? (Sports)

3.      A study by the University of Washington found that what animal could make hairpin turns at blazing fast speeds in the same way that jet fighter planes do? (Main)

4.      What is the name of the play about former President Lyndon Baines Johnson that will play at the Seattle Repertory Theatre from November 14 – December 23, 2014? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      What is President Obama’s “MyRA” short for and who is it designed to help? (Business)

6.      What popular car is turning 50 on Thursday? (NWAutos)

7.      In a series of clinical trials a new generation of antiviral medications was able to clear all signs of what the liver-ravaging virus from virtually all patients’ bloodstreams in as little as eight weeks? (Main)

8.      What are Caimans? (Traveler)

9.      What do husband and wife wood workers Kelly and Janae Cameron fashion madrona and walnut wood into? (Sunday Market)

10.   What is the name of a new disorder that some in the mental-health world are claiming to have identified, that is said to be characterized by lethargy, daydreaming and slow mental processing? (Main)

11.   According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics what was the jobless rate (%) for veterans in 2013? (NW Jobs)

12.   What remote canyon in Oregon do both the Harris Ranch Trail and Horse Creek Trail drop 3 miles into? (NW Traveler)

13.   What type of jellyfish live in the circular tank at the Seattle Aquaruim? (NW Sunday)

14.   Why are fisheries managers skipping an opening for spot shrimp on May 14th in Hood Canal and Discovery Bay? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, April 13th of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Ohio judge orders man to hold ‘I AM A Bully!’ sign (Main News, page A4).

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. What does it mean to be a “bully”? Have you ever been bullied before? How did it make you feel?
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    convicted

B.    disabled

C.    diverse

D.    feuded (feud)

E.    harassing

F.    intolerant

G.    irrationally

H.    misdemeanor

I.      retaliation

J.     stems from

 

 

1.     made up of people or things that are different from each other

  1. not based on reason, good judgment, or clear thinking
  2. to annoy or bother (someone) in a constant or repeated way

4.     to be caused by (something or someone) : to come from (something or someone)

5.     having a physical or mental disability: unable to perform one or more natural activities (such as walking or seeing) because of illness, injury, etc.

6.     to get revenge against someone

7.     not willing to allow or accept something; not willing to allow some people to have equality, freedom, or other social rights 

8.     to prove that someone is guilty of a crime in a court of law

9.     a crime that is not very serious : a crime that is less serious than a felony

10. a long and angry fight or quarrel between two people or two groups

 

Comprehension

  1. What was Edmond Aviv convicted of?
  2. How long did the judge order Edmond to hold the sign reading “I am a bully”?
  3. What did the judge also say about how large the sign’s letter must be?
  4. Where did Edmond have to stand with the sign?
  5. How long has Edmond Aviv been feuding with his neighbor?

a)     5 years

b)     10 years

c)     15 years

d)     20 years

  1. According to the article, the most recent case stems from Edmond being annoyed by what with his neighbor?
  2. What did Edmond do to his neighbor in retaliation for what he was being annoyed by?
  3. In addition to having to hold the “I am a bully” sign, name two other things the judge ordered Edmond to do.
  4. Edmond’s neighbor Prugh has 3 children with disabilities – true or false?

 

 

Additional Activities  

1.       As a class or in small groups discuss the following questions:

a)      Why do people bully each other?

b)      What should you do if you are being bullied or if you see someone being bullied?

c)       What are the effects of bullying (outcome)?

d)      What can you do (as an individual or as a school community) to combat bullying?

2.       Do you think the sentence the judge gave Edmond Aviv was too harsh, too lenient or was the right sentence to give him and why? If you don’t agree with the judge’s sentence, what sentence would you have given Edmond Aviv for his crime?

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Program Content for April 9, 2014

 

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Tuesday, April 9, 2014 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content before using in your classroom.

Tech sweetens tasks at maple-syrup time (Business, page A7 and A8

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

  1. Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about.  Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions. Also, discuss what clues the pictures accompanying the story might give you.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.     

 

A.     patrols

B.     critters

C.     stomping

D.     monitoring

E.     transmitted

F.     sap

G.    operation

H.     return (on investment)

I.       commercially

J.      tablet

K.     sensor

L.      labor

M.    remote

N.     limbs

 

1. watching, observing, listening to, or checking (something) for a special purpose over a period of time 

2. a small business or organization

3. related to or used in the buying and selling of goods and services 

4. a watery juice inside a plant that carries the plant's food 

5. a general-purpose computer contained in a single panel. Its distinguishing characteristic is the use of a touch screen as the input device.

6. to walk or go around or through (an area, building, etc.)

7. a device that detects or senses heat, light, sound, motion, etc., and then reacts to it in a particular way

8. sent (information, sound, etc.) in the form of electrical signals to a radio, television, computer, etc.

9. work for which someone is paid

10. walking or moving with very heavy or noisy steps 

11. the profit from an investment or business

12. usually small creatures or animals

13. far away or distant

14. large branches of a tree

 

Comprehension

  1. The tubes that draw sap from trees straight to__________ _________ often get pulled down or bent by falling limbs or chewed by critters…. (Fill in the blanks)
  2. How does the Tap Track system work?
  3. What happens to the data after the radio unit monitors the pressure?
  4. How is this device different from what Richards and his crew used to have to do to track leaks?
  5. The new system costs $1 to $2 per tap– true or false?
  6. What university is using a similar remote monitoring system?
  7. The ideal system would have a sensor at the __________ of each of the mainlines. (Fill in the blank)
  8. What two variables can the new remote monitoring systems lower and increase?
  9. What was the original method of collecting maple syrup?
  10. The new system is designed to help ________ to _______ scale syrup producers keep an eye on their sap lines. (Fill in the blanks)

   

Additional Activities/Questions

1. Design a diagram or process map of the radio-unit boxes, lines, smartphones and the people involved maple-syrup production. What are the steps in the process of collecting and transmitting data from the tress?

2.  As a class discuss the following questions:

a) What are the advantages of using this new monitoring system?

b) What other technological innovations does this system remind you of?

c) What percent increase did the new system generate? Is that worth the cost of the system itself?

d) Why might some sugar-makers start by purchasing fewer of the ideal systems?

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Program Content for April 7, 2014

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday April 6, 2014 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.      According to its organizers, which festival has grown to be the largest comedy/varieté festival in the world? (NW Sunday)

2.      How many years did the Seahawks extend coach Pete Carrol’s contract for? (Sports)

3.      In what year did the first modern Olympic Games open in Athens, Greece? (Main)

4.      How many students from Pacific Northwest Ballet School will be cast in Balanchine’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream”? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      According to a study commissioned by the Economic Development Council of Seattle and King County and the Workforce Development Council of Seattle-King County, how many people were employed by the maritime sectors of business statewide in 2012? (Business)

6.      What car show is Washington state’s biggest single-day auto event and a Seafair-sanctioned event? (NWAutos)

7.      China’s tiger parks or farms exist mainly to breed tigers for the marketing of what two items? (Main)

8.      What parkway in Paris was the inspiration for New York City’s High Line park? (NW Traveler)

9.      According to Betsy Burnham of Los Angeles’ Burnham Design, how many colors should a floral pattern have to look more modern? (Sunday Market)

10.   What was the name of a 1994 agreement President Clinton signed promising to “respect” the territorial integrity of the Ukraine if it gave up its nuclear weapons? (Main)

11.   What percent of the world’s online population does Spil Games report plays online games? (NW Jobs)

12.   At Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts, what do new beds allow guests to choose? (NW Traveler)

13.   According to the 5-day Seattle-area forecast, which day is forecasted to have the highest daytime temperature? (NW Sunday)

14.   Tiger Woods will not play in the Masters tournament for the first time since what year? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, April 6th of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Maritime 101: A Celebration of a Five Star Working Waterfront (Presented by Newspapers in Education and the Seattle Maritime Industry, Special Section J, page J9).

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. What comes to mind when you hear the word “Maritime”? What type of work do you think happens on the waterfront? Write down one thing you know about the maritime industry or one thing you would like to find out.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    barometric pressure

B.    condensation

C.    conservation

D.    convert

E.    effluent

F.    gross domestic product

G.    purification

H.    stewardship

I.      sustainable

J.     tsunami

K.    vested interest

L.     volume

 

 

1.     to remove dirty or harmful substances from (something)

2.     the protection of animals, plants, and natural resources; the careful use of natural resources (such as trees, oil, etc.) to prevent them from being lost or wasted 

  1. involving methods that do not completely use up or destroy natural resources
  2. liquid (such as sewage or industrial chemicals) that is released as waste
  3. atmospheric pressure as indicated by a barometer; the force exerted by the weight of air

6.     an amount of something

7.     the total value of the goods and services produced by the people of a nation during a year not including the value of income earned in foreign countries

8.     a personal or private reason for wanting something to be done or to happen

9.     to change (something) into a different form or so that it can be used in a different way

10.  the activity or job of protecting and being responsible for something

11.  a very high, large wave in the ocean that is usually caused by an earthquake under the sea and that can cause great destruction when it reaches land

12.  small drops of water that form on a cold surface

 

Comprehension

  1. Cruise ships convert ________ to produce most of the freshwater they need. (Fill in the blank)
  2. What does black water refer to on cruise ships?
  3. Today’s cruise ships are equipped with advanced wastewater ___________ systems. (Fill in the blank)
  4. What type of water represents the largest volume of wastewater generated on a cruise ship and come from cabin sinks, showers and laundry facilities?
  5. Advanced wastewater treatment systems on cruise ships treat wastewater to produce an effluent that exceeds international regulations for cleanliness – true or false?
  6. NOAA manages fisheries that produce ____________ seafood. (Fill in the blank)
  7. Name one thing that NOAA scientists collect and analyze data for from a series of onshore platforms and offshore buoys.
  8. Name one type of coastal hazard mentioned in the article that NOAA provides scientific expertise in responding to.
  9. NOAA’s mission is focused on environmental ____________, collection and analysis of scientific data, and the protection of life and property. (Fill in the blank)

 

Additional Activities  

1.       Read the article “Puget Sound’s Maritime Future At Crossroads” on page D1 of Sunday’s Business section. Then write down two new facts you learned about the maritime industry in Washington state. What was the most surprising or interesting thing you learned from this article?

2.       Visit the Port of Seattle website at: https://www.portseattle.org/Newsroom/Videos-Stories/Pages/default.aspx to learn watch port videos to learn about environmental work and other projects the port does in the community and region to create jobs and operate sustainably.

3.       Visit http://www.noaa.gov/ to look for active weather alerts and forecasts for various parts of our country.

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

 


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