NIE account
Contact NIE


















Print this page  
NEWS BREAK

 NEWS BREAK

Program Content for April 23, 2014

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, April 20, 2014 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content before using in your classroom.

Teen Supports Honeybee Research (By Kate Wilhite, Special Section, Every Day is Earth Day for Washington Farmers, page J8

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

  1. Before you read this article, make a prediction about the article. Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions.
  2. Write down one thing you know about honeybees and one thing you would like to find out.

3. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.     

A.     cliché

B.     colony collapse disorder (CCD)

C.     combating

D.     enthusiast

E.     fundraiser

F.     impact

G.    pollination

H.     prospect

I.       stock

J.      veteran

K.     vital

 

 

1.      a person who feels enthusiasm for something: a person who enjoys something very much

2.      The process by which plant pollen is transferred from the male reproductive organs to the female reproductive organs to form seeds. In flowering plants, pollen is transferred from the anther to the stigma, often by the wind or by insects.

3.      a phrase or expression that has been used so often that it is no longer original or interesting

4.      a supply of something that is available for use

5.      to have a strong effect on (something or someone)

6.       to try to stop (something) from happening or getting worse

7.      extremely important

8.      a social event held to collect money for a political party, charity, school, etc.

9.      someone who has a lot of experience in a particular activity, job, etc.

10.   a disorder affecting a large number of honeybee colonies, in which various stresses/disease may lead to the abrupt disappearance of worker bees from the hive, leaving only the queen and newly hatched bees behind and thus causing the colony to stop functioning

11.   the possibility that something will happen in the future

 

Comprehension

  1. How old is Sheridan Miller?
  2. Sheridan Miller is from Washington state – true or false?
  3. What age was Sheridan when she first became interested in honeybees and held her first fundraiser?
  4. How did she become interested in honeybees?
  5. Bees play a vital role in agriculture by doing what?
  6. Name two of the crops mentioned in the article that bees help pollinate.
  7. Sheridan recently donated $1,400 to help support a honeybee stock improvement program at what university?
  8. Over the past six years Sheridan has raised more than $5,000 to help fund research aimed at combating what?
  9. What did Sheridan do this year for local honeybee enthusiasts and concerned citizens?

 

 

Additional Activities/Questions

1. Watch the video “A Disastrous Year For Bees” at the following link: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/08/trouble-in-the-hive-researching-the-decimation-of-honeybee-colonies/

 

2.  After watching the video answer the following questions:

a) What do the commercial bee keepers in California believe is casing the die off of bees (colony collapse disorder)?

b) What percent of their insects did the beekeepers say they had lost in the last year to the die off?

c) What portion of America’s diet depends on the honeybee for pollination?

d) Name one of the crops mentioned in the video that the bees pollinate.

 

3.      Research to find out more about colony collapse disorder. Below are some websites that may be helpful. Then as a class or in small groups come up with a hypothesis for what you believe is causing CCD and what steps should be taken to address the problem.

 

http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572

 

http://www.nrdc.org/wildlife/animals/bees.asp

 

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

  

Program Content for April 21, 2014

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, April 20th of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Every Day is Earth Day for Washington Farmers (Special Section, Read article “Learn about agriculture, Washington’s Biggest Industry”, page J2).

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. What is “agriculture”? What jobs do you associate with the agriculture industry? Brainstorm a list of words or jobs you associate with the agriculture industry. Look up the definition of “agriculture” in a dictionary and then use the word “agriculture” in a sentence to demonstrate its meaning.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    acre

B.    compaction

C.    conservation

D.    export

E.    fertile

F.    invasive

G.    irrigate

H.    natural habitat

I.      organic

J.     producer

K.    sustainable

L.     till

 

 

  1. a product that is sent to another country to be sold there

2.     grown or made without the use of artificial chemicals

3.     to supply (something, such as land) with water by using artificial means (such as pipes)

4.     producing many plants or crops: able to support the growth of many plants

5.     involving methods that do not completely use up or destroy natural resources

6.     a measure of land area in the U.S. and Britain that equals 4,840 square yards (about 4,047 square meters)

7.     someone or something that grows or makes particular goods or products

8.     the protection of animals, plants, and natural resources

9.     the place or type of place where a plant or animal naturally or normally lives or grows.

10.  to prepare (soil, a piece of land, etc.) for growing crops

11.  to pack or join closely together; compress; condense

12.  tending to spread

 

 

Comprehension

  1. What is the biggest industry in Washington state?
  2. Washington state is the ________ largest state for total exports in the United States. (Multiple choice)

a)     second

b)     third

c)     fourth

d)     None of the above

  1. Washington state is second only to ___________ in the variety of crops grown in one state. (Fill in the blank)
  2. According to the article, over how many crops are grown in Washington state?
  3. Name two crops that Washington state is the number one producer of.
  4. Over ______ of Washington’s 39,500 farms are run by families. (Multiple choice)

a)     75 percent

b)     85 percent

c)     95 percent

d)     None of the above

  1.  One area of improvement where Washington’s family farmers are using new technology and techniques to increase sustainability, and that is especially critical in dry Eastern Washington is _________ _________. (Fill in the blank – two words)
  2. Some farmers in Washington use no-till farming, where the roots and stubble from the previous crop help hold the soil in place. Name one other way no-till farming benefits the soil.
  3. No-till farming practices reduce air pollution – true or false?
  4. Name one thing conservation districts work with landowners to conserve or improve.
  5. Farmers work with weed control boards to stop the spread of ________ weeds. (Fill in the blank)

 

 

Additional Activities  

1.       After reading this article write 2 – 3 paragraphs about the different ways in which agriculture affects your life.

2.       Make a list of each state or use a map and find one crop that is grown in each of the fifty states in our country and write that crop down next to/on the state it is grown in. Were you surprised by the variety of crops grown in the United States?

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday April 20, 2014 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.     What percent of inmates in Oregon currently receive visitors according to numbers from the Oregon Department of Corrections? According to a study inmates who receive visitors are less likely to do what? (NW Sunday)

2.      What Puget Sound area golf course will host the U.S. Open golf tournament in June 2015? (Sports)

3.      For any purchase worth more than 1 euro, or about $1.38, Slovakians can enter their sales receipts into what – as a way to force restaurant and shop owners to pay the sales taxes they owe? (Main)

4.      Gretchen Crossley, this year’s winner of The Seattle Times and Bartell Drugs’ 11th annual Peeps contest will be doing what with her $500 grand prize? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      In general, what is the minimum amount of years taxpayers should keep a copy of their tax returns and supporting documents for? (Business)

6.      Any retailer that sells car batteries is also required to do what? (NWAutos)

7.      How many million gallons of Alaska crude oil did the Exxon Valdez dump into Prince William Sound during the spill 25 years ago? (Main)

8.      Bahia de Loreto National Park in Mexico is made up of how many islands? (Traveler)

9.      What does Seattle artist Shawn Behling call her art and why? (Sunday Market)

10.   The Boston Marathon is held on what day, which celebrates the first battles of the Revolutionary War? (Main)

11.   What is the net worth of Bill Gates, who was ranked the richest man in the world on the 2013 Forbes 400 list? (NW Jobs)

12.   When was the 756,000 acre Sawtooth National Recreation Area established by Congress and in what state is it located? (NW Traveler)

13.   What are voters being asked to do for a third time since 2000 in order to fund King County Metro Transit? (NW Sunday)

14.   In surveys taken last year it was discovered that 77 percent of licensed Washington state anglers target what type of fish? (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

Program Content for April 16, 2014

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Monday, April 14, 2014 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content before using in your classroom.

Gloomy town reflects on way to soak up the sun (By Suzanne Daley, Main News page A6

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

  1. Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about.  Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions. Also, discuss what clues the picture accompanying the story might give you.
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.     

 

A.     bolstering

B.     contribution

C.     cutting edge

D.     generator

E.     in concert

F.     industrialist

G.    mechanism

H.     opponent

I.       produced

J.      petition

K.     quaint

L.      setbacks

 

 

1.      a written document that people sign to show that they want a person or organization to do or change something

2.      together

3.      someone who owns or manages an industry

4.      the newest and most advanced area of activity in an art, science, etc.

5.      to make (something) especially by using machines

6.      something that is done to cause something to happen

7.      a problem that makes progress more difficult or success less likely

8.      a piece of machinery: a mechanical part or group of parts having a particular function

9.      a machine that produces electricity

10.   having an old-fashioned or unusual quality or appearance that is usually attractive or appealing

11.   to make (something) stronger or better; to give support to (something)

12.   a person, group. Etc. that is against something (such as an action, law, or system): someone or something that does not want something to exist, be done, etc.

 

 

Comprehension  

  1. In what country is the gloomy town of Rjukan located?
  2. Where does the sun disappear to and how long does it disappear for during the year?
  3. Martin Andersen, an artist and newcomer to the town, came up with the idea of using huge mirrors to get sunlight to the town – true or false?
  4. What two ways are the mirrors powered?
  5. How did many residents of the town say life changed after the mirrors were installed?
  6. Most of the people in the town of 6,000 signed the petition to block the mirror project– true or false?
  7. What happened that bolstered the argument of those who called the project a waste of money?
  8. At one point, the mirrors stopped working altogether. Explained what happened and what was done to get the mirrors working again.
  9. The town of Rjukan was built by the industrialist Samuel Eyde. What did Eyde build, that still exists today, so his employees could get sunshine in the winter?

     

Additional Activities/Questions

1. Read the following section from the article: Others, however have not been impressed. Annar Torresvold, 77 and his wife, Anne-Lise Odegaard, 70, still think the 5 million kroner (roughly $840,000) spent on the mirrors might have been better spent elsewhere. They worry about a possible closing of the hospital, the quality of the schools and health care for seniors. Do you think the money for the mirror project was well spent – why or why not? Do you think that the money would have been better spent on some of the other services mentioned?   

 

2.  As a class discuss the following questions:

a) Would you want to live somewhere that was without sunlight for the majority of the year?

b) How do you think the lack of sunlight might affect you (emotionally, physically)? Make a list of the effects it might have on you.

c) Can you think of another alternative besides mirrors to capture the sunlight that might be an effective alternative?

 

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

 


HOME | ABOUT NIE | EDUCATORS | ELEMENTARY
MIDDLE SCHOOL | HIGH SCHOOL | COLLEGE | PARENTS
Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company
Privacy statement





Register Now for Elementary, Middle School and High School Programs!