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NEWS BREAK

  NEWS BREAK

Program Content for March 2, 2015

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, March 1, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

Tupperware hits its ‘sweet spot’ in Indonesia (Main News, page A2)

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. What do you think “Tupperware” is? Look at the picture accompanying the article. What are the women in the picture holding? What do you think the women in the picture are doing?
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    array

B.    equivalent

C.    dynamism

D.    hawk

E.    indestructible

F.    longevity

G.    marketplace

H.    poverty

I.      recruit

J.     scuttlebutt

K.    social networks

L.     targets

M.   testimonial

N.    twist

O.    workforce

  

1.     energy and a strong desire to make something happen

2.     a written or spoken statement in which you say that you used a product or service and liked it

3.     long life

4.     a network of friends, colleagues, and other personal contacts

5.     the state of being poor

6.     to offer (something) for sale especially by calling out or by going from one person to another

7.     the person or group that someone is trying to influence, sell something to, etc.

8.     the number of people in a country or area who are available for work

9.     a large group or number of things

10.  the economic system through which different companies compete with each other to sell their products

11.  impossible to break or destroy

12.  to find suitable people and get them to join a company, an organization, the armed forces, etc.

13.  an unexpected or strange occurrence

14.  having the same value, use, meaning, etc.

15.  talk or stories about someone that may not be true  

 

Comprehension

  1. What it “Tupperware”?
  2. The birthplace of Tupperware is _______. (Multiple Choice)

a)     Germany

b)     Indiana

c)     Massachusetts

d)     None of the above

  1. Before Indonesia, what country was the top marketplace for Tupperware?
  2. According to the article who in Indonesia are potential targets for Tupperware?
  3. The Tupperware company business model is built on tapping into _______ _______. (Fill in the blank – two words)
  4. Explain what the Indonesian tradition of arisan is.
  5. The arisan often serve as informal banks in Indonesia and women can pool their money. How does this help with the sale of Tupperware at an arisan?
  6. For some women who choose to join Tupperware’s Indonesian sales force it has provided them with a way out of _________. (Fill in the blank)
  7. Indonesia’s 1974 Marriage Law states that the wife is the head of the family and that the husband is the caretaker of the family – true or false?
  8. Amelia, one of the Tupperware saleswomen in the article was helping her husband to keep their restaurant afloat when she convinced him to let her take the Tupperware job and start selling part time. Explain what ended up happening when she started selling Tupperware.

 

Additional Activities  

1)     Think of a product you have used and liked. Did you tell your friends or someone else about it? What did you say about the product? Write a testimonial for a product that you used and liked or for a company that you had a great experience with. Use some of the following questions to help you write your testimonial:

a)     Why did you choose the product or the company you did?

b)     What do you like about the company or product that is unique?

c)     Did the product or the company help you solve a problem?

d)     Why would you recommend this company or product to others?

2)     Have you ever been asked to attend a “Tupperware” style party for a product or do you know someone who has? What types of products could be sold this way? Do you think this is a good way to sell products – why or why not? As a class or in small groups brainstorm a list of benefits and drawbacks to selling a product this way versus selling a product in a store or online.  

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, March 1, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.      Beginning in what month will Seattle residents see $1 fines, due to mandatory composting rules, added to their utility bills if collectors notice more than 10 percent of items in the garbage are misplaced? (NW Sunday)

2.      Which women’s college basketball team clinched the number one spot in the West Coast Conference for its 11th straight title? (Sports)

3.      What former White House official was hired by Amazon.com to run global corporate affairs? (Main)

4.      Of the 1,959 passengers aboard the RMS Lusitania how many perished when the ship was hit by a torpedo? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      Since 2003, the Internal Revenue Service has partnered with tax-software companies to provide free federal tax-return prep and e-filing for low and middle-income individuals. What is the program known as? (Business)

6.      For the 2015 J.D. Power and Associates’ annual vehicle dependability study, which minivan came out on top? (NWAutos)

7.      What country is now the top marketplace for Tupperware, once a fixture in middle-class U.S. kitchens? (Main)

8.      What is “trilice” in Istanbul?  (NW Traveler)

9.      “Eye Pop Art’s Cuff Bracelets” are handmade from what recycled item? (Sunday Market)

10.   How many potential presidential candidates for the 2016 Republican nomination were each given 20 minutes before the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC)? (Main)

11.   According to a recent study what percentage U.S. workers admitted they have made mistakes at work because they were tired? (NW Jobs)

12.   What shape are the leaves of the Hawaiian plant “taro”? (NW Traveler)

13.   Most fares on King County Metro Transit will go up by how much beginning Sunday, March 1, 2015? (NW Sunday)

14.   What did runner Katie Mackey, a former University of Washington All-American win a bronze medal for last year? (Pacific NW)

15.  What has become a defining feature of the Chambers Bay golf course and which hole do most players consider the signature hole?  (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

Program Content for February 25, 2015

Wednesday's News Break selects an article from Monday, February 23, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected story and answer the attached study questions. 

Huge plant waited 80 years to flower, now has month to live (Main News, page A4

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary

1.      Before you read this article, as a class discuss what you think this story will be about. Write down any keywords from the title, which you used to make your predictions. Also discuss what clues the picture accompanying the article might give you.

 

2.       Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.           

 

A.     botanical garden

B.     clone

C.     cultivating

D.     fibrous

E.     flowering

F.     native

G.    preceded

H.     pod

I.       propagate

J.      reproduce

K.     specimen

L.      stalk

M.    typically

N.     variegated

O.    viable

  

1.      to produce flowers

2.      generally or normallyused to say what normally happens

3.      to happen, go, or come before (something or someone)

4.      to produce babies, young animals, new plants, etc.

5.      to grow and care for (plants)

6.      a long, thin part of some plants that has seeds inside

7.      a thick or tall stem of a plant

8.      a large usually public garden where plants are grown in order to be studied

9.      capable of living or of developing into a living thing

10.   containing, made of, or resembling fibers

11.   having patches, stripes, or marks of different colors

12.   something (such as an animal or plant) collected as an example of a particular kind of thing

13.   a plant or animal that is grown from one cell of its parent and that has exactly the same genes as its parent

14.   used to refer to the place or type of place where a plant or animal normally or naturally lives

15.   to produce (a new plant)   

  

Comprehension  

  1. Where is the American agave plant native to?
  2. According to the article, what happened to the 80 year-old agave plant that preceded its flowering?
  3. Why will the plant be taken down next month?
  4. The 80 year-old plant is a variegated form of the American agave. Variegated plants often have some other color than ________ in their leaves.( Fill in the blank)
  5. Variegated plants don’t usually survive to reproduce successfully unless what happens? (Fill in the blank)
  6. The agave plant produced “tons” of seeds. Students are picking seeds that are ________. (Fill in the blank)
  7. What will happen to the seeds that the students have been picking?
  8. Mike Palmer, the horticultural manager of the school’s botanical gardens, said he hasn’t decided what to do with the plant’s fibrous stalk, but he gave a sample to a music professor. What did he give a sample to the music professor for?
  9. In addition to the agave plant’s unusually long life, Palmer was surprised that the plant did not produce what?
  10. Typically the American agave plant lives _________years. (Multiple Choice)

a)     5 to 10

b)     10 to 30

c)     30 to 60

d)     60 to 80

 

Additional Activities  

1.      Have students break into small groups and discuss what plants require to grow. Then have students make a chart listing a variety of plants (at least 5 – 10). Have students include information on size, color, habitat (native location), and other unique features of the plant. Students can include a drawing or a picture of each plant next to its name on the chart. Have students determine the different needs for each of the plants on their list and the reason for this (size, habitat, etc.)

Below are some websites to help students in their research.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/ and http://www.theplantlist.org/

2.      Have students watch a Scholastic “Study Jams!” video about flowering plants, the male and female parts of the plant, and the process of fertilization and pollination. http://studyjams.scholastic.com/studyjams/jams/science/plants/flowers.htm

Afterwards students can click on the “Test Yourself” button to take a short quiz about the video. Next, have students make a detailed drawing of a flowering plant, labeling each of the male and female parts they just learned about. Below are some websites with diagrams that may be helpful to students.

http://urbanext.illinois.edu/gpe/case4/c4facts1a.html http://www.saps.org.uk/secondary/teaching-resources/707-parts-of-a-plant-and-a-flower

 

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

Program Content for February 23, 2015

Scavenger Hunt  

Sunday’s News Break challenges you to hunt through the Sunday, February 22, 2015 e-Edition of The Seattle Times to find answers to the following questions.

 

1.      According to the 5-day Seattle-area forecast, which day of the week will be mostly sunny? (NW Sunday)

2.      How many points down was the Gonzaga men’s basketball team when they rallied to beat Saint Mary’s 70 – 60 on Saturday night? (Sports)

3.      How many dollars worth of cargo due West Coast ports handle annually? (Main)

4.      How many times has actress Julianne Moore been an Oscar nominee? (NW Arts & Life)

5.      What does McCarthy Music, a Seattle software startup company make? (Business)

6.      The average price of used-cars is up by what percent from 2013’s average? (NWAutos)

7.      The U.S. and Britain discussed new sanctions against what country due to cease-fire violations? (Main)

8.      What is the oldest art museum in the Pacific Northwest and when was it founded?  (NW Traveler)

9.      What is Pantone’s color of the year for 2015? (The official name and the color) (Sunday Market)

10.   What city earned the title of being the world’s most polluted city last year? (Main)

11.   What percentage of Americans said in a recent Monster Survey, they would be willing to move to a different country for their dream job? (NW Jobs)

12.   In what year did Mount Vesuvius erupt, burying the city of Pompeii? (NW Traveler)

13.   How many acres of Washington state lands are currently open to hunting in Washington? Where is hunting currently prohibited in Washington? (NW Sunday)

14.   Before going heading out to go snowshoeing, whom should you check the weather conditions with first? (Pacific NW)

15.  Major League Baseball’s biggest change is Rule 6.02. If a hitter is in violation of Rule 6.02, what is the umpire allowed to do to the hitter without a pitch being thrown?  (Sports)

   

News Break is posted to the Web on Monday and Wednesday. Please share the NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition of the newspaper please call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

Sunday's News Break selects an article from Sunday, February 22, 2015 of The Seattle Times e-Edition for an in-depth reading of the news. Read the selected article and answer the attached study questions. Please remember to always preview the content of the article before sharing with your students.

India’s air pollution cuts shorts millions of lives, researchers say (Main News, page A4)

Pre-Reading and Vocabulary  

  1. What types of things can cause air pollution? What health risks or problems do you think are associated with air pollution?
  2. Vocabulary:  Match the words to the numbered definitions below.

 

A.    conservative

B.    deems

C.    dubious

D.    estimated

E.    extensive

F.    fossil fuels

G.    microgram

H.    monitoring

I.      particulate matter

J.     penetrate

K.    polluted

L.     prematurely

M.   reliance

N.    retards

O.    rural

  

1.     a guess that you make based on the information you have about the size, amount, etc., of something

2.     to make (land, water, air, etc.) dirty and not safe or suitable to use

3.     the state of needing someone or something for help, support, etc.

4.     a fuel (such as coal, oil, or natural gas) that is formed in the earth from dead plants or animals

5.     to think of (someone or something) in a particular way

6.     minute airborne liquid or solid particles (such as dust, fume, mist, smog, smoke) that cause air pollution

7.     a unit of mass or weight equal to one millionth of a gram, used chiefly in microchemistry

8.     happening too soon or earlier than usual

9.     large in size or amount : very full or complete

10.  to slow down the development or progress of (something)

11.  to go through or into something

12.  used to describe something bad or undesirable as if it were an honor or achievement

13.  of or relating to the country and the people who live there instead of the city

14.  used to describe a guess, estimate, etc., that is probably lower than the actual amount will be

15.  to watch, observe, listen to, or check (something) for a special purpose over a period of time

 

Comprehension

  1. According to the research published on India, the nationwide pollution is cutting the lives of 660 million people short by approximately how many years?
  2. India developed extreme air pollution while relying on burning ________ ________ to grow its economy. (Fill in the blanks)
  3. According to the article, what dubious title did the city of New Delhi, India earn last year?
  4. India has _______ cities on the World Health Organization’s list of the 20 most polluted. (Multiple Choice)

a)     3

b)     10

c)     13

d)     None of the above

  1. Why is the small size of particulate matter called PM2.5, of especially great health concern?
  2. More than 300 million Indians still have no access to __________. (Fill in the blank)
  3. To meet its goal for coal-fired electricity what did the Power Ministry in India say it will do to coal production within five years?
  4. India’s system for monitoring air quality has sensors installed in each city – true or false?
  5. Name one reason mentioned in the article, why rural air pollution in India remains high.
  6. There are no regulations for sulfur dioxide emissions in India – true or false?

 

Additional Activities  

1)     As a class or in small groups have students discuss the following questions:

a)     What places do you think would have the cleanest air in the city/community you live in and why?

b)     What places do you think the air would be the dirtiest and why?

c)     What do you think is the number one cause of air pollution in the United States?

d)     What one thing do you think you could do to reduce air pollution in the United States or where you live?

 

2)     The Air-quality Index or AQI is used for reporting daily air quality. It tells you how clean or polluted the air is where you live and what associated health effects might be a concern for you.Have your students go to the weather page of this Sunday’s newspaper on page B8 and view the Air-quality Index chart on the left hand side of page. What does the index show that today’s main offender to the air quality is? What color are the bars on the chart for each city listed? If your city isn’t listed have students visit http://www.airnow.gov/ and enter your zip code or state to find out what the current air quality is for your area.

 

News Break is posted to the Web on Wednesday and Friday. Please share this NIE News Break program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register on-line or call 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655. Copyright © 2015 The Seattle Times Company

 

 

 

 


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