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Speaking of News

Teaching News is Elementary

 

Program Content for December 19, 2014

Each week, this lesson will share some classroom activity ideas that use the newspaper or other NIE resources.  You are encouraged to modify this lesson to fit the needs of your students.  For example, some classrooms may be able to use this as a worksheet and others might need to ask and answer the questions in a class discussion. 

Please be sure to preview all NIE content before using it in your classroom to ensure it is appropriate for all of your students.

Materials you will need for this lesson: The Seattle Times e-Edition, colored pens, pencils or crayons and paper or poster board for list, poster or pamphlet project

Article: “Recycling 101: Help Keep the Evergreen State Clean All Season Long: Have Fun with Recycling this Holiday Season”

Pages: I8

Date: Sunday, December 14, 2014

 

Pre- Reading Discussion Questions: 

 

Look at the title and images on page 18. How do you think you can have fun with recycling this holiday season? What type of recycling do you do all year-round? What type of recycling do you do especially in the holiday season?

 

Vocabulary: 

 

Read the following quotes and determine the meaning of the word based on how it’s used in the sentence:

 

Consider gifts that are environmentally friendly and sustainable.

 

(involving methods that do not completely use up or destroy natural resources)

 

 Consider repurposing recycled items such as glass bottles and aluminum cans or discarded household items like light bulbs, into unique holiday crafts, gifts and decorations.

 

(repurpose: to change (something) so that it can be used for a different purpose or intention)

 

(discarded: thrown away because something is useless or unwanted)

 

Reuse gift tags by converting them into holiday cards or decorations.


(to change (something) into a different form or so that it can be used in a different way)

 

Journal Writing Prompts: 

 

“Consider gifts that are environmentally friendly and sustainable.”

 

What does it mean for a gift to be environmentally friendly and sustainable? Make a list of these types of gifts and who they would be good to give to. How do these gifts help the environment? Are these gifts less or more expensive than similar items which are not environmentally friendly and sustainable? 

 

Discussion Questions:

 

Review the excerpt and discuss the following questions:

 

“Consider alternative gifts such as charitable donations or volunteerism in the recipient’s name. Consider repurposing recycled items such as glass bottles and aluminum cans or discarded household items like light bulbs, into unique holiday crafts, gifts and decorations.”

 

What charitable donations or volunteer opportunities would make good gifts? Why? What are other examples of alternative gifts? What type of crafts, gifts, and decorations can you make from recycled and discarded items including glass bottles, aluminum cans, and light bulbs? Make a craft, gift or decoration and share it with the class.

 

Small group discussion and activity: 

 

“We encourage families to make recycling a part of their holiday tradition. It’s a simple way to make a positive difference in the local environment by diverting items that can be recycled. It can also potentially save your family money by identifying items that can be reused in creative ways.”

 

Using the suggestions from this article, create a list, poster or pamphlet outlining holiday recycling tips for your family or classroom. Choose which group of people you will create the project for and address the tips to those people. Place your completed project in your home or classroom where others can see it.

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

Program Content for December 11, 2014

 

Each week, this lesson will share some classroom activity ideas that use the newspaper or other NIE resources.  You are encouraged to modify this lesson to fit the needs of your students.  For example, some classrooms may be able to use this as a worksheet and others might need to ask and answer the questions in a class discussion. 

Please be sure to preview all NIE content before using it in your classroom to ensure it is appropriate for all of your students.

Materials you will need for this lesson: The Seattle Times e-Edition

Article: “Quileute Petroglyph Ceremony: Historic Carving”

Pages: A1 and A7

Date: Thursday, December 11, 2014

 

Pre- Reading Discussion Questions: 

 

Look at the title, map and photograph on page A1. What part of Washington is the Quileute reservation in? How far do you think it is by car or plane from where you live? What do you think the person is pointing to in the photograph?

 

Vocabulary: 

 

Read the following quotes and determine the meaning of the word based on how it’s used in the sentence:

 

It was big — about 2 feet in diameter, with a domelike top filled with grooves and small depressions. Reid scraped off some moss so they could see it better.

 

(an area on a surface that is lower than other parts: a low spot)

 

 The rock they stumbled upon appears to be a carving that depicts a legendary battle in Quileute mythology, according to tribal and state officials.

 

(to show (someone or something) in a picture, painting, photograph, etc.)

 

The mud-tinted river was square in the middle of a storm that was dumping several inches of rain on the region and sending whitecaps and dead trees hurtling downstream.


(waves that break into small white bubbles at their highest point)

 

Journal Writing Prompts: 

 

“The Red Lizard, according to Quileute legend, made his home near the narrowest point of land between the Calawah and Sol Duc rivers and stopped people using it as a shortcut from one to the other. K’wati, a figure of good who was known as the ‘transformer’ and turned the Quileutes from wolves into people, eventually killed the Red Lizard, who had a much poorer reputation.”

 

Using the above description as a guide, write your own version of the Quileute legend of the Red Lizard. Describe the Red Lizard and K’wati characters, the places, and their action in detail. Is there a lesson or message that you can share through your telling of the legend? 

 

Discussion Questions:

 

Review the excerpt and discuss the following questions:

 

“But Marion Jackson, Eugene’ Jackson’s younger sister, who also came to the ceremony, doesn’t think of the rock as just something from the past. ‘I’m excited,’ said Marion Jackson, as she stood just a few feet from it. ‘I feel like our ancestors are definitely talking to us.’”

 

What artifacts does your family have from the past? Are these items ways that your ancestors talk to you? Why or why not? If you don’t have these kinds of artifacts in your family, what items are sometimes, or could be, used as artifacts? Why is it important to have items from the past that tell a story?

 

Small group discussion and activity: 

 

“There hadn’t been any good fishing on the Calawah River the day last December when Erik Wasankari and his son Reid found the rock.

   It was a damp, cold day when the pair, on their lunch break, saw the rock and walked into the river, which was running shallow, to inspect it.

   It was big — about 2 feet in diameter, with a domelike top filled with grooves and small depressions. Reid scraped off some moss so they could see it better.

   All Wasankari could make out were “just some triangles and rectangles and shapes,” but he realized they had found something special.”

 

Continue the above description by writing a story about the men’s discovery. The story should be different than what you learned in the article. Continue to describe the rock and explain why it is “something special.”

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 


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