NIE account
Contact NIE

















Science Time

Science Time

Program Content for October 22, 2014

Read the article “Leukemia patients helped by experimental cell therapy” on page A2 of the Thursday, October 16, 2014 edition of The Seattle Times.

 Vocabulary and pre-reading:  Define each term and use it in a sentence to demonstrate your understanding.

1.      remission

2.      relapse

3.      transplant

4.      transfusion

5.      acute

 

Comprehension Questions

1.      How does a new experimental therapy that brings prolonged remission to advanced leukemia patients work?  

2.      How many patients were involved in this study?  

3.      Before this new experimental treatment what was a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia’s best hope of survival?  

4.      How many people are affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the United States each year?  

5.      Who is more likely to be cured of acute lymphoblastic leukemia?  

6.      What are T-cells?

7.      What role do T-cells play in the newly developed experimental treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?  

8.      What role do B-cells play in the newly developed experimental treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?  

9.      What is one negative side effect of the new experimental treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?  

10.    How effective is the new experimental treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia?  

 

Prompts and Extensions

1.      Watch this animation to learn more about how T-cells, B-cells, and other parts of a healthy immune system work.

2.      Research and report on what acute lymphoblastic leukemia is all about.  Include information about what causes this type of cancer, the parts of the body it affects, warning signs, tests that are used to diagnose the cancer, and treatments.  Use the National Cancer Institute website to start your research.

3.      Watch this news report and hear from patients who have successfully recovered from acute lymphoblastic leukemia thanks to this new experimental treatment.

4.      The new experimental treatment utilized to fight acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a type of gene therapy being used to fight a variety of cancers.  Watch this video clip to get a detailed look at how gene therapy is being used to cure diseases.

 

Science Time is posted to the Web on Wednesdays. Please share this NIE Science Time program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register by e-mailing nie@seattletimes.com or by calling 206/652-6290 or toll-free 1-888/775-2655.

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

Program Content for October 15, 2014

Read the article “Alzheimer’s brain cells are replicated in petri dish” on page A2 of the Monday, October 13, 2014 edition of The Seattle Times.

 

Vocabulary and pre-reading:  Define each term and use it in a sentence to demonstrate your understanding.

1.        enzyme

2.        petri dish

3.        neuron

4.        gene

5.        dementia

 

Comprehension Questions

1.        What is Alzheimer’s in a dish?  

2.        What problem does Alzheimer's in a dish solve?  

3.        Before Alzheimer’s in a dish was created how was this disease studied?  

4.        What led to the scientists success at growing Alzheimer brain cells in a dish?  

5.        What are two (2) defining features of brain cells with Alzheimer’s disease?  

6.        How do brain cells with Alzheimer’s grown in a dish differ from those inside a human brain?  

7.        How many drugs will soon be tested on Alzheimer brain cells grown in a petri dish?  

8.        What is amyloid?  

9.        When scientist Tanzi tested an enzyme using brain cells with Alzheimer’s in a dish what did he discover?  

10.     How was the Alzheimer’s in a dish system created?  

11.     How and why does Alzheimer’s begin?  

12.     Why are mice commonly used to test experimental drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer’s?  

 

Prompts and Extensions

1.        Watch this Ted Ed video clip to learn more about the discovery, disease progression, and treatment of Alzheimer’s.

2.        The use of a the mouse as a model organism to study diseases like Alzheimer’s has come under scrutiny in recent months.  Read this article to learn more about the risks and benefits of using a mouse model to study human diseases.

3.        Watch this PBS special on how those afflicted with Alzheimer’s and their families cope with the disease’s progression.

4.        Visit the scientific journal Nature’s website to read an excerpt of the scientific paper highlighting the discovery at the focus of this article and view images of how brain cell’s with Alzheimer’s were developed.

 

Science Time is posted to the Web on Wednesdays. Please share this NIE Science Time program with other teachers. To sign-up for the electronic edition for your class, please register

Copyright © 2014 The Seattle Times Company

 

S


HOME | ABOUT NIE | EDUCATORS | ELEMENTARY
MIDDLE SCHOOL | HIGH SCHOOL | COLLEGE | PARENTS
Copyright © 2005 The Seattle Times Company
Privacy statement





Register Now for Elementary, Middle School and High School Programs!